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CEUfast Blog CEUFast Nurse Chronicles, Part 1: Funny & Touching Stories From the Lives of Passionate Nurses

CEUFast Nurse Chronicles, Part 1: Funny & Touching Stories From the Lives of Passionate Nurses  

Written by Kristal Roberts
Nurse Gives Shot

Nursing isn’t the easiest profession in the world, but it’s one of the most rewarding professions by far. Over the last few weeks, we were fortunate enough to receive several dozen stories from nurses who entered CEUFast’s Nurses Who Rock contest and they managed to lift our moods and make us smile. We hope they do the same for you.

 

If you have a story you would like to share with us, send it to kristal.roberts@ceufast.com

 

“I became a nurse later in life and I absolutely love it. I work in plastic surgery doing pre/post and circulating in the OR. My patients love me as i always bring humor into play. Most patients are very nervous and if you make them feel comfortable and make light, while maintaining the best care. I treat my patients as if they were a family member or close friend. I am also known at work as the professional ‘hand holder’ which i always do as it comforts the patients. I really feel its about the little things in making people less nervous and more comfortable. In my job i always try to remember i have seen hundreds of procedures and surgeries but, the patient has not so its only natural that they would be scared. I find with humor it really helps lighten up the mood. I have gotten many positive reviews from patient and i do nothing special but be myself and show some compassion by letting the patient know im here for them expressing this by touch and humor.”

Nicole Kreiner, RN surgical nurse at Schuster Plastic surgery


“I am Ann OR nurse, went to meet my patient who was crying, once I introduced myself I asked what can I do to put her at ease, she told me that the SDS nurse told her she could not take her religious medal with her to OR. I reassured her that it is not a problem and she could take it with her. She immediately was relieved. She held tight to it until she fell asleep, I then returned placed it under her pillow until she was in recovery. Being an advocate for the patient is an awesome responsibility as a nurse.”
Gracia Domen, Memorial Hospital


“As an administrator overseeing twenty nurses, I may not always be involved in direct patient care, but I have the honor and satisfaction of hearing and seeing the compassion and hard work each of these amazing nurses put into their patient care, using what they have learned, and gaining new knowledge along the way. As a result, I often get a sense of pride, knowing that maybe a part of my teaching, guidance, and setting good examples, has maybe helped to direct them. As nurses, we use critical thinking, but somewhere along the way, we have been taught; by our teachers, preceptors, and even our patients. We learn something new every day. Obviously, our patients are the ones who benefit the most, but in my position, I feel I also benefit, seeing the results of what education can do. Being able to pass on to other nurses my experiences, and what I have learned, is the most enjoyable part of my job. I went into nursing to help others, it is why I love nursing and why I love the teaching aspect of my job, whether it be to patients and their families or to other nurses. It is the most rewarding thing I know! To learn and to teach others, and continue the cycle every day!”

Debbie Biggar, RN at ADON White Sands Treatment Center


Why I became a Nurse

The reason I became a nurse was to help people and to witness the love of God to them through my genuine concern for their health and well being. The type of nurse that I wanted to be and that I feel I am today is patient care and safety first. Being able to share life’s ups and downs that they are going through with me, and together being able to decide on what possible outcomes will be the best for them is the highlight of nursing for me. The smile and the tears of joy and sadness we share in the complete privacy of their hospital room makes this job more of a journey through different doors and not just “a job”.

The funniest moment in my nursing career had to have been when a physician asked me to borrow an ink pen and I pulled out a tampon. He looked at me and I looked at him with my face reddening as we spoke with just eye contact. Not only did we just look at it, we both started to laugh uncontrollably. He finally spoke and said, “Jeannine, I honestly don’t think anyone could see anything I could write with this”. The laughter continued. I still remember that today and the physician also still works here at the hospital. Laughter is also good medicine.

The greatest accomplishment over the last year has been that I have obtained both PALS and ACLS certification at the hospital where I work. As an LPN, II, my duties in a code situation is record keeper. Not only that but through the use of closed loop communication, I get to repeat all orders for medications ordered and times. This allows for the whole team to know what has been given and to think ahead of what is to be given, if the need arises.

With the knowledge I have acquired over the years that I have been a nurse it has taken me to where I am today. My Name is Jeannine Michelle Webb. I am an LPN, II and work at Doctors Memorial Hospital in Bonifay, Florida. I work in Nursing Administration.

I assist in re-writing policy and procedures, obtain stats for various categories such as ER transfers, MD arrival times in the ER, RN triage times in the ER, Deaths in the ER, Reports monthly and quarterly for Blood Transfusion, Clinical Pertinence, Do Not Use Abbreviations (Unapproved Abbreviations), AMA’s, Unsigned Physician Orders after 48 hours and up-grade list and posts for nurses. I work with both the DON and the ER Supervisor closely. Not only this, I continue to work as an ER nurse, Floor nurse and at times PACU/RECOVERY room nurse.

The personal relationships/friendships that I have made over the last 24 years, I wouldn’t trade for the world. The encouragement given, the reprimands (Rarely ever given) and the understanding of the profession and what we hold in our hands, ANOTHER LIFE, keeps me in check with reality.  Life is short and just one error or lack of judgment could end all of this.

I am forever grateful to my LORD, JESUS CHRIST, MY SAVIOUR and SOON COMING KING for allowing me to travel this road. The days are sometimes hills with the valleys yet clarity is what we must see. HE alone opened every door for me to walk through and become a nurse. I have never been in nursing for the money. Praise God.”

Jeannine Webb, LPN, II