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CEUfast Blog - Category: Nurse History

Posted  October 11, 2017

 

“Work more and better the coming year than the previous year.”

Such was the motto of Mary Eliza Mahoney. Today, Mahoney isn't a household name like Florence Nightingale, the mother of modern nursing, or Mary Breckinridge, who pioneered the concept of family medical centers and health care in rural areas, — But she deserves the same recognition for her pioneering work in the profession.


Posted  August 30, 2017

 

Within a month of landing on the beach in Korea in 1950, nurse Margaret (Zane) Fleming and her fellow nurses with the 1st Mobile Army Surgical Hospital were attacked. The group of 13 Army nurses was traveling with the 7th Infantry Division from Incheon to Pusan when enemy forces ambushed them. They ran to a nearby ditch to take cover and watched as gunfire and burning vehicles lit up the sky. At sunrise they ventured out and went to work, treating the wounded. Eight men died, and some of the supply vehicles were lost. None of the nurses were injured.

Because of nurses like Fleming, traveling with troops and working in MASH units, wounded people survived. During World War II, the fatality rate for seriously injured troops was 4.5 percent; during the Korean War, it was reduced to 2.5 percent.


Posted  August 2, 2017
florence nightingale

 

“Were there none who were discontented with what they have, the world would never reach anything better.”

 

These powerful words—spoken by a woman steeped in conviction to help others—were reinforced by the actions of her life. To be so ready to renounce all that had been handed to her—an eligible upbringing promising everything that a Victorian woman could desire—to reduce herself to a profession held as immodest and unsuitable for a lady of her social status required immense tenacity and self-belief. Her determination, sacrifice, and confidence are the reason we have since seen a medical renaissance in nursing practices and militaristic triage efforts. For all of these reasons and more, Florence Nightingale unarguably deserves the title “Mother of Modern Nursing.”


Posted  July 4, 2017
revolutionarywarimage1

 

“I may be compelled to face danger, but never fear it, and while our soldiers can stand and fight, I can stand and feed and nurse them,” said Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross.

It seems most nurses share this feeling, and although medicine was in no way sophisticated by the time of the American Revolutionary War, men and women did what they could to care for the soldiers under their watch.


Posted  June 13, 2017
Clara Barton Small

 

Clara Barton was no stranger to the dangers of war: while serving as a nurse during the Civil War, a bullet skimmed her sleeve and killed the soldier she was caring for. “A ball had passed between my body and the right arm which supported him, cutting through the sleeve and passing through his chest from shoulder to shoulder,” she recalled. “There was no more to be done for him and I left him to his rest. I have never mended that hole in my sleeve.”


Written by Kristal Roberts 
Nurse Mary Breckinridge

 

March isn’t just the month that kicks off spring, it’s National Women’s History Month! In honor of a month that celebrates women’s contributions to the United States, we’ve decided to shine a light on nurses who have impacted our beloved calling for the better. 

When it comes to historically relevant nurses, many people start by paying homage to nurse icon Florence Nightingale, an English nurse who became famous for bringing sanitation improvements during the Crimean war in the 1850s and developing the Army Medical College and Nightingale School & Home for Nurses.


Written by Kristal Roberts

It’s your week---National Nurses Week, that is!

It kicks off today, May 6, and ends on May 12, the birthday of nursing trailblazer Florence Nightingale.


Written by Julia Tortorice
Nurses and child

Photo by: Seattle Municipal Archives (Flickr)

Being a nurse myself, you might think I'm a little biased in writing this blog post, but there are amazing nurses who have deeply affected the world in which we live. We often think about famous presidents or events which have shaped our history, but there are also famous nurses in history. Some of the world's most famous nursing leaders have shaped health care into what it is today. Without these influential, brave, and strong women, we nurses might not have the vocation that we know and love.

It took famous nursing leaders to put nursing on the map, and many of these famous nurses in history improved nursing practices for nurses and their patients. Whether they demanded better training or equality, changed legislation, or simply taught us how to care, many of these influential women have shaped our industry into the positive and important industry it is today. Let's look at ten of the most influential nurses in history.


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